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Prisoners of War & Internees

 
Americans Held As Prisoners of War By the Japanese in World War II
 
 
pto pows
Allied POWs being liberated by the US Navy. Aomori Camp (near Yokohama), Japan, August 29, 1945. National Archives
(80-G-490444)

 
 
 
 
 
Name
Branch(es)
Description
Austin L. Andrews Navy Mr. Andrews served in the US Navy in China and the Philippines on several ships and shore installations. He was taken prisoner when US forces in Bataan and Corregidor surrendered and endured three-and-a-half years of brutal captivity as a POW, including time at the Cabanatuan Prison camp, the Nagata Maru hell ship, and the Umeda Bunso Camp (Osaka, Japan).
Harold A. Bergbower
Army Air Corps
Mr. Bergbower served with the 28th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group, V Bomber Command, until the surrender of the Philippines. He endured years of subjugation as a prisoner of war and slave laborer in the following camps: Malaybalay, Davao Penal Colony, Toyihomo, Shinjuku in Japan. Member of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.
Army; Army Air Forces
Dr. Brown, a member of the 24th Pursuit Group, V Interceptor Command, fought in the Philippines. until the surrender of Bataan. He survived the Bataan Death March and spent the remainder of the war as a POW in the following camps: Hakodate, Babai, Machi, Hokkaido Island. Member of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.
Thomas G. Calderone
Army
Mr. Calderone fought with the 31st Infantry Regiment in the Philippines until the surrender of Corregidor. He was held at the following camps: O'Donnell, Cabanatuan, Clark Field, Bilibid and Nagoya #6, Nomach, Japan. He survived a "hell ship" voyage on the Nota Maru and endured years of subjugation as slave labor. Member of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.
Alfred C. McGrew Army Mr. Andrews served in the US Army Coastal Artillery Corps in the Philippines. He was taken prisoner when US forces in Bataan and Corregidor surrendered and endured three-and-a-half years of brutal captivity as a POW, including time at the Cabanatuan Prison Camps 1 & 3, the Bilibid Prison Camp, the Noto Maru hell ship, and Kawasaki in Japan.
Robert W. Phillips
Army Air Forces
Rev. Phillips served with the 28th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group, V Bomber Command, in the US Army Air Corps until the surrender of the Philippines. He endured years of subjugation as a prisoner of war and slave laborer in the following camps: Malaybalay, Bilibid, Mitsui, Tokyo Army Hosp, Shinagawa & Hitachi.
Army
Mr. Reamer served in the US Army in the 60th Coast Artillery Regiment, F Battery, an antiaircraft unit tied into the harbor defenses of Manila and Subic Bays, until the surrender of Corregidor.  Held as a prisoner of war, he spent a long period of time in solitary confinement in Osaka Sakai Prison. Member of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.
Army
Mr. Senna served in the Army Corps of Engineers and was captured by the Japanese on Bataan in early 1942. During his three-and-a-half years as a POW, he survived the Bataan Death March, imprisonment in Camp O'Donnell and Cabanatuan in the Philippines, the Haro Maru Hell Ship and enslavement in Japan. Member of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.
Joseph A. Vater
Army
Mr. Vater served in the US Army Corps of Engineers, 803rd Engineer Battalion (Aviation), Company A, until the surrender of Corregidor. He was held as a prisoner of war until the end of the war in the following camps: Billibid, Cabanatuan Number 3 and Hoten. He survived a "hell ship" voyage on the Tottori Maru from the Philippines. to Formosa, Pusan, Korea, and, finally, ending in Mukden, Manchuria. Throughout, he endured years of subjugation as slave labor. Member of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.
Army Air Forces
Mr. Zapf served as a radio operator on a B-29 based on Tinian. After being shot down on 8/8/45, Zapf and his surviving crew mates endured captivity at the hands of the Japanese and were held in Hiroshima shortly after the atomic bomb had destroyed most of the city.
American Civilians Held As Internees By the Japanese in World War II
 
Leonard Brooks
 
Mr. Brooks grew up as the child of missionaries in the Philippines. He and his family endured the Japanese occupation from 1942 to 1945, including internment in the Los Banos internment camp. He was liberated by Allied forces in the famed 2/23/45 raid on Los Banos. After returning to the US, he was drafted and served in the Army of Occupation in Europe. He spent much of his career in the missionary field in the Philippines and the US.
 
Americans Held As Prisoners of War By the Germans in World War II
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US soldiers being led into captivity following the surprise German offensive in the Ardennes in December 1944.
National Archives, captured German photograph
(111-SC-198240)
Name
Branch(es)
Description
William S. Blaher
Army
 
Mr. Blaher served as an infantryman in the 106th Infantry Division in the ETO. He was taken prisoner during the Battle of the Bulge and spent five months in captivity at Stalag IXB.
Timothy G. Dyas Army LTC Dyas was born in Brooklyn, NY, and later raised in Queens, NY.  He entered the US Army in 1941, trained at Fort Ethan Allen, VT, and later joined the Airborne and trained at Fort Bragg, NC.  He served with the 82nd Airborne Division, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, First Battalion, A Company.  He jumped with the 82nd in the invasion of Sicily and fought until captured near Catelgerone.  He spent 23 months as a POW in Stalags IIB, IIIB and IIIA. After WWII, he used the GI Bill to earn degrees at NYU and Harvard.  He spent his career in education, eventually becoming principal of Millburn High School in Millburn, NJ.
Army
Mr. Joel served as an infantryman in the 106th Infantry Division in the ETO. He was captured during the Battle of the Bulge and spent the remainder of the war in a POW camp.
Army
Dr. Johnson served as an infantry officer in the ETO. After being wounded during the Normandy Campaign, he was captured, but he was liberated weeks later when his POW hospital was overrun by the Allies.
Army Air Forces
Mr. King flew missions in a B-24 until his plane was shot down over Austria. He spent the remainder of the war in several POW camps.
Edward J. Leonard Army Mr. Leonard served in an US Army cavalry regiment during the last days of the horse-mounted cavalry and after its mechanization during the Second World War. After serving in North Africa, Italy and Southern France, he was taken POW and held in the Kustrin and Luckenwalde stalags and at a farm in Hackenough. Before the war, he also worked for the CCC in Montana.
Edward J. Leonard Army Mr. Leonard served in an US Army cavalry regiment during the last days of the horse-mounted cavalry and after its mechanization during the Second World War. After serving in North Africa, Italy and Southern France, he was taken POW and held in the Kustrin and Luckenwalde stalags and at a farm in Hackenough. Before the war, he also worked for the CCC in Montana.
Army
Mr. Pope served as an artilleryman in the ETO. Captured during the Battle of the Bulge, he survived life as a POW until escaping in April 1945.
Army Air Forces
Mr. Gordon served as a navigator on a B-17 for nine missions over Europe before being shot down and captured. He spent 16 months as a prisoner in Stalag Luft I.
Army

Mr. Salerno served as a rifleman in the 106th Infantry Division in the European Theater during WWII. He was captured during the Battle of the Bulge and was imprisoned for the remainder of the war in Stalag IV-B and at a worksite near Gleina, Germany.

Charles Sloca Army Air Forces Dr. Sloca served as a pilot on a B-17 in the European Theater. He was shot down in August 1944 and was imprisoned as a POW at Stalag Luft III and Marlag-Milag.
 
 
 
 
Americans Held As Prisoners of War By Other Forces in World War II
Army
Mr. Inglesby served as a paratrooper in the 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion. He participated in the first US airborne operation of World War II during Operation: TORCH, the invasion of North Africa. He was briefly held captive by French forces.
Americans Held As Internees By a Neutral Power in World War II
US Army Air Forces
Mr. Clark flew missions in B-24s with the 44th Bomb Group. His plane was shot down and forced to land in Switzerland, where he was interned until he escaped after D-Day.
 

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